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Watch Bill Nye The Science Guy

Bill Nye The Science Guy

imdb logo8.4/10
ChildrenComedyall1993 - 19985 SeasonsSeries EndedTags:Kids

Bill Nye the Science Guy is an educational television program that originally aired from September 10, 1993 to June 20, 1998, hosted by William "Bill" Nye and produced by Buena Vista Television. The show aired on PBS Kids and was also syndicated to local stations. Each of the 100 episodes aims to teach a specific topic in science to a preteen audience. The show is frequently used in schools as an education medium, and it still airs on some PBS stations for this reason. Created by comedian Ross Shafer and based on sketches on KING-TV's sketch program Almost Live!, Bill Nye the Science Guy was produced by Disney Educational Productions and KCTS-TV of Seattle. Bill Nye the Science Guy won nineteen Emmy Awards during its run.

Where to Watch Bill Nye The Science Guy

103 Episodes

Where to stream every episode from all 5 seasons of Bill Nye The Science Guy. Filter these episodes by what's available to watch free or on your streaming services using the tabs above.

Season 1

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Season 01, Episode 01 Flight

S01 E01

Sep 10, 1993
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Flight Sep 10, 1993 Things that fly need air. Even though we walk through it, breathe it, and sneeze it, air seems to be a whole bunch of nothing. But air is there, and it's powerful. Balloons inflate because air presses on the insides and outsides of the balloon. Air pressure in tires supports the weight of bikes, buses, trucks, cars, and planes. But air doesn't need to be inside something to exert pressure. Air that moves around pushes, too. What do birds, planes, kites, Frisbees, and helicopters have in common? They fly because moving air creates lift, or a push up. Airplane wings are shaped to push air down. The momentum of the air going down pushes wings up. Air above the wing gets going faster than the air underneath. Fast-moving air zips along, without pushing as hard side to side or up and down. The slow air pushes up from below harder than the fast air pushes down from above ... and you're airborne! Every flying thing, from the tiniest flying insect to the biggest airplane, us

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Season 01, Episode 02 Earth's Crust

S01 E02

Sep 17, 1993
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Earth's Crust Sep 17, 1993 Don't just go with the flow. Settle down on the crust. Imagine a world without any crust. There would be no pies, just goopy filling, no bread, no hamburger buns, and no you or me. That's right. You, and every living thing we know of, live on or in the Earth's crust. And, living things need the Earth's crust to survive. Let's look at the science of the surface. By carefully studying the Earth's surface, scientists have discovered that the Earth is made up of gigantic layers. At the center of the Earth, there is a core – a big ball of solid metal mostly iron. The core is surrounded by a layer of liquid iron and other minerals. We usually just call it the outer core. The next layer, around the outer core is called the mantle. You may have seen a mantle above a fireplace. Well, the mantle is above the Earth's hot core places. The mantle is gooey hot nearly melted rock that flows the way asphalt does on a hot summer day. Scientists often say that the mantle is plastic. It

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Season 01, Episode 03 Dinosaurs

S01 E03

Sep 24, 1993
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Dinosaurs Sep 24, 1993 We can dish the real dirt about dinosaurs, thanks to fossils - traces of theses astonishing animals. Dinosaurs did not print newspapers. They did not take family snapshots or videos 65 million years ago. The only proof scientists have of dinosaurs is their fossils, especially bones. They would never have survived billions of years waiting for some human to trip over them. Luckily for paleontologists (scientists who study the past), now and then dinosaurs died, and their bones were covered by mud, or sand. As the bones sat protected from weather, they absorbed minerals from the soil around them. The minerals chemically worked their way into the bones. Millions of years later, we can find them and dig them up. Humans were not around to see what actually killed the ancient dinosaurs. Many scientists think a meteorite, or lots of meteorites, crashed into the Earth. When the space rocks hit the ground, they made big craters and kicked up a lot of dust and dirt. If enough d

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Season 01, Episode 04 Skin

S01 E04

Oct 1, 1993
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Skin Oct 1, 1993 Learning about skin science is no sweat. It's gigantic. It's gargantuan. It's your skin. It's your body's biggest organ. If you could lay your skin out flat, it would cover about one and a half square meters. Your skin stops you from drying out, protects you from the weather, and keeps bacteria and viruses from getting inside your body. Your skin is also your personal air conditioner and heater all in one. Sweating cools you off. When you're hot, glands in your skin push a mixture of water and other chemicals onto the surface of your skin. When the water evaporates, it takes some of the heat with it, and you're cooler. When you're too cold, your skin muscles start twitching. Shivering makes your body warm up. Without skin, you wouldn't be able to feel the difference between a sheet of paper and a wool blanket. There are thousands of touch receptors inside skin. When you touch the remote control, the receptors send information about the remote's temperature, thicknes

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Season 01, Episode 05 Buoyancy

S01 E05

Oct 8, 1993
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Buoyancy Oct 8, 1993 A hot-air balln ride and a trip to the aquarium help Bill Nye explain why things float

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Season 01, Episode 06 Gravity

S01 E06

Oct 15, 1993
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Gravity Oct 15, 1993 Next time you throw a ball in the air, and it doesn't fly off into outer space, thank gravity. Right now, you and everything in the room where you are, is getting pulled down by gravity. If you don't believe it, push a book of your desk. It will go plummeting toward the center of the Earth. It's gravity. The Earth's mass, the stuff it's made of, creates gravity. It's pulling down on you and every other object you can see; it's even pulling down on the air and the ocean. Not only that, you and every atom of every thing around you has gravity. So, the objects and atoms are all, ever so slightly, pulling up on the Earth! Without gravity, there would be no weight. When you step on a bathroom scale, the scale is getting squeezed between you and the Earth. The scale measures how strong this mutual attraction is. Gravity makes a force that pulls objects together. Not only is gravity pulling on every atom and molecule of everything around us, it pulls over huge, gigantic di

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Season 01, Episode 07 Digestion

S01 E07

Oct 22, 1993
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Digestion Oct 22, 1993 Take time to digest this show. They say that your food is no more inside you than a pencil is inside a donut, when it's poked through the hole. Instead of the food going in you, food goes through you. But, all the energy you get to live and grow comes from your food. All the chemicals that become your body and brain as you get bigger, come from your food. You get these vital chemicals through a process called ""digestion."" Your body breaks food down and grabs all the nutrients you need from it. Then, your body gets rid of what's left over. Digestion starts in your mouth. You begin breaking food down by breaking it into pieces with your teeth and jaw muscles. Your saliva (your spit) is full of chemicals that react with the chemicals in food and make them break apart. Then you swallow. Your food goes down a tube (your esophagus) to your stomach, where powerful hydrochloric acid breaks it down further into a mushy mash we call chime (kime). From there, the chime goes in

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Season 2

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Season 02, Episode 01 Magnetism

S02 E01

Feb 18, 1994
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Magnetism Feb 18, 1994 They're on your refrigerator, they're inside your computer, and you're even standing on one right now. They're magnets, and forget about being repulsed. Bill Nye the Science Guy's "Magnetism" episode is totally attractive. All magnets have certain things in common. All magnets have two poles - north and south. You could take a magnet and break it into pieces and all of the pieces would have north and south poles. Ever play with two magnets? If you hold them with one magnet's north pole facing the other's south pole, they will stick together. If you put two of the same poles together, the magnets will push apart. With magnets, opposite poles attract, and "like" poles repel. Ever wonder why the Earth has a North and South Pole? The Earth's hot, churning, iron core is like a giant magnet. The magnetic force of the Earth stops a lot of harmful radiation from reaching us. Charged particles streaming from the Sun get pulled down by the Earth's magnetic field, creating the

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Season 02, Episode 02 Wind

S02 E02

Feb 25, 1994
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Wind Feb 25, 1994 Some answers, my friend, do in fact, blow in the wind. A cool breeze is great on a hot summer day. A cold winter wind can chill you until you can't stop shivering. Where does all that wind come from? It starts with the Sun. Energy from the Sun warms the Earth and the atmosphere, the air, above it. As the world turns into darkness each night, the atmosphere cools off. The molecules in a mass of warm air are more spread out than the molecules of air in a cold air mass. So cold air is heavier than warm air. Cool air masses squeeze warm air up. That's why you may hear people say, "Warm air rises." The Sun warms the Earth with huge amounts of heat each day. And, the Earth is spinning. So, as air masses move up and down, they get nudged sideways along the Earth's surface at the same time. Try drawing a straight line on a spinning ball. It'll curve. The same thing happens to make wind. Air travels all over the Earth moving across deserts, up and down mountains, through val

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Season 02, Episode 03 Blood & Circulation

S02 E03

Mar 4, 1994
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Blood & Circulation Mar 4, 1994 It's time for a heart-to-heart talk about blood and circulation with Bill Nye the Science Guy. Your blood is your bud. Without blood, your skin would dry up and fall off, your internal organs would die, and your brain would be kaput. Blood gives every cell in your body the food and oxygen it needs to survive. Blood also cleans up after our cells by carrying away waste. Blood even protects your body from disease. What more could you ask from a friend? Blood patrols your entire body. Blood is pushed around by a powerful pump called the heart. Every time your heart lub-dubs, blood is propelled through tubes called arteries, capillaries, and veins. Your heat pushes your blood in a complete loop around your body about 2,000 times every day. Your heart is a muscle, and, like all muscles, it can get stronger. A healthy heart needs exercise to stay strong. An average heart pumps about 70 times a minute, but a healthy, well-exercised heart pumps 50 or 60 times a minute. Heal

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Season 02, Episode 04 Chemical Reactions

S02 E04

Mar 11, 1994
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Chemical Reactions Mar 11, 1994 Bill is practically exploding with excitement about the "Chemical Reactions" show. Every single thing around you is made of chemicals. Plants, rocks, computers, food, and you are bunches of chemicals. All chemicals are built with elements, the 109 different symbols on the Periodic Table. Different combinations of elements make different chemicals. Lots of times, chemicals just sit around, but sometimes, when certain chemicals get together, they react. Chemical reactions take the starting chemicals and end up with new chemicals. Sometimes chemical reactions are hard to miss. Explosions, burning, color changes, and gas are all good signs that a reaction is going on. Some chemical reactions are less obvious - changes in temperature, a different smell, or differences in taste are clues that a chemical reaction is happening. The key is to figure out if you could get back the same chemicals you put in. If the answer is no, you've got a chemical reaction on your hands. Jus

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Season 02, Episode 05 Static Electricity

S02 E05

Mar 18, 1994
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Static Electricity Mar 18, 1994 Bill's all charged up about the "Static Electricity" show. It happens to all of us. You're causally walking along, maybe dragging your feet a little, when you reach out to shake a friend's hand and - ZAP! Both you and your friend get shocked. The spark is static electricity, a buildup of charged electrons. Electrons are a part of all atoms, the building blocks of all stuff, including you and me. All electrons have a negative charge. Negatively charged electrons push away from other negatively charged electrons. Like charges repel each other. When electrons build up in an area, a charge builds up, and it's just waiting to be released. This buildup of charge is called static electricity. Charges can jump around between things, especially when things are rubbed together. When you drag your feet on the carpet, electrons from the carpet jump onto you. As the charge builds up, the electrons get too close to each other, and they need a place to escape. They get their chanc

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Season 02, Episode 06 Food Web

S02 E06

Mar 25, 1994
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Food Web Mar 25, 1994 Feeling a little hungry? Then grab a snack and watch Bill Nye the Science Guy's episode on the Food Web. When it comes to eating, all living things depend on other living things. Take a chicken sandwich, for example. The bread came from plants. So did the lettuce and tomatoes. The cheese was made from milk, which came from a cow. To make milk, the cow had to stay alive by eating grass. The meat came from a chicken who once ate seed, and maybe the occasional bug. The animals that helped to make your sandwich depended on other living things to survive. The lettuce, grain (for the bread), and tomato got by fine on their own. Then some animal came along (you). Plants are the only big living things that don't need other living things to survive. All they need are sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water to make their own food. But it doesn't stop them from being eaten -- no way. In fact, plants are great things to eat. All animals need them in some way for food – by the way,

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Season 02, Episode 07 Light Optics

S02 E07

Sep 10, 1994
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Light Optics Sep 10, 1994 They're on your refrigerator, they're inside your computer, and you're even standing on one right now. They're magnets, and forget about being repulsed. Bill Nye the Science Guy's ""Magnetism"" episode is totally attractive. All magnets have certain things in common. All magnets have two poles - north and south. You could take a magnet and break it into pieces and all of the pieces would have north and south poles. Ever play with two magnets? If you hold them with one magnet's north pole facing the other's south pole, they will stick together. If you put two of the same poles together, the magnets will push apart. With magnets, opposite poles attract, and ""like"" poles repel. Ever wonder why the Earth has a North and South Pole? The Earth's hot, churning, iron core is like a giant magnet. The magnetic force of the Earth stops a lot of harmful radiation from reaching us. Charged particles streaming from the Sun get pulled down by the Earth's magnetic field, creating the

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